Winter break a must for Premier League

by admin

Saturday, December 18th, 2010
 

Tim Gudgin must be sitting at home, snugly tucked up by a winter fire, safe in the knowledge that he can be in and out of work in five minutes flat – The BBC Final Score reader won’t be too busy today. Weather has obliterated most of the fixture list, rendering football fans deprived of first class football up and down the land. But more than fans missing out on frostbite and the opportunity to buy a snood, the winter snow should blow in a change to the footballing calender, and one that can make a world of difference – especially in the summertime.

Back in 2006 that wise old owl Sven-Goran Eriksson, during his time in charge of the national team pushed for a two week break during the coldest part of the year to help players recover from the gruelling Premier League schedule. Recently Sven suggested that “because of the money the Premier League never accepted that.” And that’s the end of that. But who is benefiting from cancelled games and refunded tickets to those unwilling to travel again in the biting cold to a half empty stadium? What’s that I hear you say? Fans lose out to Premier League money-making agenda? Shock Horror.

“Why do The FA spend millions on training facilities and top class accommodation for highly tuned athletes only for them to turn up like a horse flogged half to death by a packed fixture list?

But what if there is a benefit to the Premier League Fat Cat’s?  What if there is a new, invigorated fresh attitude to football, bought about by, oh I don’t know, England winning, or even just doing well in the World Cup? England underwhelmed in South Africa no doubt, and more than a few weeks off in winter is required to sort that mess out. But why not give them the best possible chance of winning? Why do The FA spend millions on training facilities and top class accommodation for highly tuned athletes only for them to turn up like a horse flogged half to death by a packed fixture list? It’s time the F.A and the Premier League’s governing body worked together for the benefit of not only supporters but themselves. Attendances have dropped this season on average by around two thousand since Sven’s final tournament in charge. Even that statistic is slightly warped by the continued success of the “big four” propping up the more rapidly declining attendances at the likes of Wigan and Blackburn. What’s likely to remedy this? A shot in the arm for the national game to reignite the love affair the English population have with the beautiful game – an English national team succeeding.

A table published by Goal.com in the aftermath of England’s World Cup debacle revealed that the English Premier League had the highest amount of games in a season played over a time period as the other  major European leagues. In that time the Italian, Spanish and German leagues all have a winter break, make of this what you will. I do hope the Premier League received a copy.

Wayne Rooney and Fabio Cappello recently added their voices to the ever growing grumble of managers and players forced onto rock hard pitches and out into the biting cold. As I write the sole remaining Premier League Sunday fixture has been called off. There must be a better and more sensible solution to this problem. For the benefit of the fans, and the Three Lions. Surely the Premier League have to see the light sooner rather than later.

Be Sociable, Share!

Previous post:

Next post: